Another Haiti is Possible

As Cholera Resurges in Haiti, the UN’s Commitment to Prevent It Fails

November 5, 2015

Reposted from PassBlue

Originally Released on October 18, 2015

By Nancy Young

Street displays of photos featuring Haitians affected by cholera were recently mounted in Port-au-Prince, the capital, above, and near the United Nations in New York and Geneva. The occasion? The fifth anniversary of cholera being inadvertently brought to Haiti by UN peacekeepers. Photo courtesy of INSIDE OUT.

HINCHE, Haiti — We were driving back from watching a soccer game here in central Haiti when my friend instinctively rolled up his window. It can get dusty on Haitian country roads, so I rolled up mine, too, even though I didn’t see anything in the air.

Haitian Cholera Victims Tell UN to “Face Justice”

October 14, 2015

New Campaign Brings Victims’ Portraits to UN for Five-Year Anniversary

GENEVA, NEW YORK, PORT-AU-PRINCE, October 13, 2015—On the morning of October 14, activists will be erecting large portraits of cholera victims outside the United Nations (UN) offices in New York, Geneva and Port-au-Prince to commemorate the 9,000 lives lost from cholera brought to Haiti by UN peacekeepers five years ago.  The portraits are a part of a new campaign, Face Justice, which calls on the UN to hear victims’ calls for justice.  The campaign demands that the UN accept responsibility for causing the epidemic through faulty waste management, provide reparations, and invest in water and sanitation to eliminate cholera.

The Dominican Republic, Haitians and the Global War on Blackness

July 7, 2015

By Claudia De La Cruz

Reposted from on July 7, 2015

[OPINION] Current efforts to remove Haitians from the Caribbean Nation speak to DR's long history of anti-Black policy

My grandmother was born Black and poor in Trujillo's Dominican Republic. She was only five years old when the state-sanctioned killings of thousands of Haitian migrants widely known as "the Parsley Massacre" occurred.  As a means of survival, like many other poor Blacks in the Dominican Republic, my grandma worked the sugarcane and rice fields side-by-side Haitian migrants. She often told stories about the way they were discriminated against and often beaten for being Black and poor. She cried telling stories of women and girls who were sexually assaulted by the overseers of the fields and military men. In a spirit of hope and affirmation she would add, "The good thing was that we did what we could to survive together [Haitians and Dominicans] on those fields."


50 Years Of Cutting Cane May Not Be Enough To Keep Dominican Republic From Deporting You

June 30, 2015

By Roque Planas

Reposted from on July 1, 2015

SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic -- When André Pérez first left Haiti for the Dominican Republic in 1964, his new employer gave him a machete, a gallon of water and a bag. The 14-year-old boy went to work cutting cane, one of the most grueling jobs the hemisphere offers, and one that is intimately tied to the advent of racial slavery his birth country had rebelled against in the 18th century. For the next five decades, he swung a machete under the tropical sun.

VIDEO: Check out a Short Doc on the Haitian Birthright Crisis

June 23, 2015

By Sameer Rao

Reposted from on June 26, 2015

As our country heals from the scars left by the murders in Charleston, the world is also witnessing a human rights catastrophe whose origins also partly lay in the imperialistic, racially-divisive policies of the United States. At present, hundreds of thousands of Haitians residing in the Dominican Republic (many of whom were born on Dominican soil) and working in the country are facing the threat of forced deportation. The current wave of deportations and violence has immediate roots in a 2013 court decision that decreed that being born in the Dominican Republic did not automatically constitute citizenship, but it stretches back as far as the 1937 genocide of Haitians by US-backed dictator Rafael Trujillo and remained in the form of culturally-ingrained anti-Haitian sentiment.


Berta Cáceres, Honduran Indigenous Leader, Wins Goldman Prize

April 20, 2015

From Other Worlds' latest Newsletter April 20, 2015:

Berta Cáceres Receives Goldman Prize | 250 Years Later, Haitians Still Fighting for Rights to Their Land | Other Worlds Cafe | Ayiti Resurrect

Berta Caceres and the people of Rio Blanco set up a road blockade to prevent DESA's access to the dam site. For well over a year, they withstood multiple eviction attempts and violent attacks from militarized security contractors and the Honduran armed forces. (Photo Credit: Goldman Environmental Prize)

Today, the Goldman Environmental Prize - the most prestigious environmental award in the world - honors our dear sister Berta Cáceres and the fight for indigenous lands and participatory democracy in Honduras.

Fate of Haitians left Hanging in the Dominican Republic

April 15, 2015

By Hisham Ali, Al Jazeera

Reposted from on April 15, 2015

On March 17, the Dominican Republic reopened its consulates in Haiti after weeks of tension and negotiations. The diplomatic outposts had been closed two weeks earlier after thousands of people in the Haitian capital marched from the foreign ministry to the Dominican embassy, protesting the killing of a Haitian man a few days earlier in Santiago, a city in the neighbouring Dominican Republic.


March 12, 2015

By Beverly Bell

Popular radio advocate Sony Estéus in his make-shift radio studio just after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Photo Credit: Roberto (Bear) Guerra 

On the last day of his life, popular radio advocate Sony Estéus was to attend the opening of Voice of Ile-à-Vâche Community Radio (Radio VKI by its Creole acronym), the newest in an expanding network of grassroots stations throughout Haiti. Sony had worked with farmers and fishermen on the island of Ile-à-Vâche for seven years to establish the station.

On March 1, 2015, instead, the 50-year-old Sony died from as-yet-unknown causes.


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