Another Haiti is Possible

It’s been five years since Haiti’s earthquake. And the ‘redevelopment’ hasn’t been about helping Haitians.

January 16, 2015

The rebuilding of Haiti is not working.

By Nixon Boumba

Cross-posted from Washington Post

Orignially released on January 12, 2015

Anti-government protesters in Port-au-Prince last month called for President Michel Martelly’s resignation. (HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)

Five years ago this month, a terrible earthquake struck my country. I was in the capital city, Port-au-Prince, when suddenly the earth shook and buildings around me and across the city collapsed—taking with them hundreds of thousands of lives and the hopes of my nation. The world stood with us that day and in the weeks and months that followed. Donations poured in; the United States and many other governments pledged to help us rebuild Haiti. But five years into the reconstruction, as a Haitian, I must ask: For whom are we rebuilding our country?

FIVE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE IN HAITI, THE SAD STATE OF DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS

January 11, 2015

An Interview with Human Rights Organizer Jackson Doliscar

By Beverly Bell

Jackson Doliscar, community organizer and human rights defender.

Some things never change. In Haiti, no matter the century or decade in question, one can be certain that: the state and elite are trouncing the rights and needs of the majority, the population is protesting to demand land and justice, and the international community is taking the wrong side.

Five years after the earthquake that killed an estimated 200,000 to 300,000 (no one knows for sure) and rendered 1.9 million more people homeless, the fraudulently elected administration of Michel Martelly has abandoned any pretense of democracy. Having failed to hold elections three years in a row, instead letting national and local elective seats become vacant, the government now rules by decree. It is also attacking and killing human rights defenders. The elite, in combination with foreign corporations, are seizing land for agribusiness, mining, tourism, and free trade zones. The grassroots has taken to the streets to demand democratic government and an end to foreign occupation by the UN. Social movements are also mobilizing for defense of land, housing, and rights. The US has, until recent months, staunchly supported the government. It has backed this support with “security” funding, including more than $7 million for the police in 2015, for a nation not at war against anyone but its own people.

Jackson Doliscar is a community organizer and human rights defender. Since the earthquake, he has been the primary outreach worker in an international campaign for the right to housing for those left languishing under tents, through the Force for Reflection and Action on Housing (FRAKKA, by its Creole acronym). This is the first in a two-part series.

Another Black Boy Gunned Down by Police

December 17, 2014

By Beverly Bell

We will never learn of the names, lives, and deaths of countless Black men and boys murdered by police - and slavery enforcers, hate groups, vigilantes, and a host of others – dating back to the earliest days of this country’s history. The names and stories of a slew of recent victims of extrajudicial executions, such as Eric Garner and Michael Brown, and the exoneration of their killers, have become widely known through the blowback of public fury.

This is a tale of another Black boy whose name and wrongful death were never reported in any official document or national media. The policeman responsible was not charged, indicted, or prosecuted. This child’s prematurely snuffed life was not spent in the US but in the Black nation of Haiti, though the US government subsidized his murderer.

Help Haitian Family Farmers Keep Their Lands

December 2, 2014

Other Worlds is excited to announce the launch of our fundraiser for our Hatian land rights campaign on Global Giving!

Read on about our project and our fundraiser, and please consider a donation today!

All recurring monthly donations will be matched by an anonymous donor, so you can double your impact!  
On December 10, Global Giving will match all donations of $25 to $1,000 at 15%!
In order for our campaign to have a permanent spot on Global Giving, we must meet our $5,000 goal by December 31. Please make a donation to support Haitians in their struggle for their human rights and land rights today.

Summary

Family farmers across Haiti have joined together to protect their lands from theft by tourism corporations, mining, and seizure by large landholders. These farmers are some of the poorest and hungriest people in the world. Other Worlds supports Haitians in their struggle for their human rights and land rights through media, advocacy, education, legal defense, international support, and funds, so they can stay on their ancestral land, keep farming, and feed their children.
 

 

HAITIAN TOURISM PROJECT LEADS TO ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE AND COMMUNITY REPRESSION

September 11, 2014

By Other Worlds and the Solidarity and Resistance Collective for the Population of Île-à-Vache

“Destination Île-à-Vache” is a government-driven tourist project planned for a small island off the northern coast of Haiti, Île-à-Vache. Plans include an international airport, golf courses,1,500 hotel bungalows, agri-tourism, and “tourist villages” which will include boutiques, restaurants and even a night club. Groundbreaking on the project occurred in August, 2013, without the inclusion or participation of the community.

For Disenfranchised Haitian Islanders, Tourism Signals a Paradise Lost

August 20, 2014

Cross Posted from Inter Press Service News Agency

By Judith Scherr

Homes like these in the village of Madam Bernard, Ile à Vache, Haiti, might be removed to make way for tourist development or islanders removed from other areas might be relocated here. Credit: Judith Scherr/IPS

 

Like It or Not: Île à Vache Haiti “Open for Business”

June 10, 2014
Cross-posted from Counterpunch.
 
by MARK SCHULLER

Recently Haiti President Michel Martelly celebrated his third year in office. He gained wide support from the U.S. on his election platform which persists as his administration’s slogan: “Haiti is open for business.” Three days after his inauguration, Martelly landed at Île à Vache’s Abaka Bay resort and extended an offer of one million dollars to become 51% shareholder to then-owner Robert Dietrich.

GENDER EQUITY FOR RURAL HAITIAN WOMEN: AN INTERVIEW WITH KETTLY ALEXANDRE OF THE PEASANT MOVEMENT OF PAPAY

April 22, 2014

 

Interviewed by Beverly Bell, Edited by Jessica Hsu

April 22, 2014


Kettly Alexandre of the Peasant Movement of Papay Women's Committee. Photo: Beverly Bell

The Peasant Movement of Papay (MPP) is one of the largest small-farmer associations in Haiti with 70,000 members, of whom close to half are women. MPP was founded in 1973 to improve the living conditions of small farmers while working for social and economic justice. Here, Kettly Alexandre of the MPP Women’s Committee speaks to advances made over 40 years for women’s rights, equity, and an end to violence.

Amnesty Action Alert

December 13, 2013

reposted from Amnesty International
 
URGENT ACTION 
Families forcibly evicted, 100 more at risk 

Around 60 families have been forcibly evicted from their homes in an informal settlement in the area of Titanyen on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti. A further 100 families face a similar threat. Many of them are victims of the January 2010 earthquake who had already been forcibly evicted from their makeshift camp in May 2012.

Rapid Response Network Calls for Solidarity with Garment Workers in Haiti against Wage Theft and Exploitation!

November 27, 2013

Cross-posted from One Struggle

By organizers for the Rapid Response Network

“We start work at six o’clock. We finish at five. We don’t have time to eat because we cannot meet the quota. The pants, the T-shirts—we are the ones producing them. We labor hard, and we don’t get paid.”
– Manuel (Union of Textile & Apparel Workers – Batay Ouvriye).

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