Another Haiti is Possible

Fault Lines: Views across Haiti’s Divide

October 29, 2013

Cross Posted from Focus on Haiti by Nic Johnson

At the launch of Beverly Bell’s new book Fault Lines: Views across Haiti’s Divide last Sunday, I joined a group of more than thirty devoted readers, supporters, and colleagues overflowing the bustling back room of The Coupe in Washington, D.C. The book surveys the conditions in displaced persons camps, shantytowns, and rural villages in the year following the 2010 earthquake, but what makes the book truly unique is Bell’s use of street journalism and personal experiences to report sentiments at a local level.

Apartheid in the Americas: Are you Haitian?

October 27, 2013

Cross-posted from Myriam Chancy

The implications of the ruling of September 23 by the Constitutional Tribunal of the Dominican Republic, stripping citizenship from the offspring of non-resident Haitians born in the Dominican Republic, where nationality is conferred “jus soli,” by place of birth, are only beginning to be understood by the international community with the OAS, Amnesty International, and the governments of Trinidad & Tobago, Guyana, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, openly condemning the violation of human rights it represents.  Hanging in the balance are the lives of nearly a quarter of a million Dominicans of Haitian descent–of all ages–who have been rendered stateless by the ruling, in what has been deemed a human rights crisis in the making.

Dominicans of Haitian Descent Cast Into Legal Limbo by Court

October 27, 2013

Cross-posted from the New York Times

By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD

SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic — For generations, people of Haitian descent have been an inextricable part of life here, often looked at with suspicion and dismay, but largely relied on all the same to clean rooms, build things cheaply and provide the backbreaking labor needed on the country’s vast sugar plantations.

Behind Haiti's Hunger

October 23, 2013

Cross-Posted from Haiti Grassroots Watch

 Port-au-Prince, HAITI, 10 October 2013 – During the past year or so in Haiti, as humanitarian actors raised a cry of alarm about hunger, Haiti Grassroots Watch (HGW) journalists kept hearing complaints and rumors about the misuse, abuse, or negative effects of food aid.

Haiti’s Imported Disaster

October 22, 2013

Cross-posted from the New York Times

Haiti’s cholera epidemic, now entering its fourth year, has killed more than 8,300 people and sickened more than 650,000. It is a calamity, though one fundamentally different from the earthquake, hurricanes and floods that have beset the fragile country since 2010.

URGENT ACTION: Hundreds face violent forced eviction

October 22, 2013

Cross-posted from Amnesty International

Hundreds of people left homeless after the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti are the victims of an ongoing violent campaign involving police officers to forcibly evict them from their makeshift shelters.

Residents of the Lanmè Frape area of Canaan, an informal settlement in the municipality of Cabaret, on the northern outskirts of the capital, Port-au-Prince, have had their simple dwellings repeatedly destroyed by police officers accompanied by armed men. The residents told Amnesty International that they have been the victims of attacks on more than 10 occasions over the last 18 months and several of them have also been arrested on unfounded charges for periods of up to a month. Two hundred families  currently remain in the Lanmè Frape area, although as many as 600 lived there before the forced evictions began.

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