Another Haiti is Possible


April 22, 2014


Interviewed by Beverly Bell, Edited by Jessica Hsu

April 22, 2014

Kettly Alexandre of the Peasant Movement of Papay Women's Committee. Photo: Beverly Bell

The Peasant Movement of Papay (MPP) is one of the largest small-farmer associations in Haiti with 70,000 members, of whom close to half are women. MPP was founded in 1973 to improve the living conditions of small farmers while working for social and economic justice. Here, Kettly Alexandre of the MPP Women’s Committee speaks to advances made over 40 years for women’s rights, equity, and an end to violence.

Amnesty Action Alert

December 13, 2013

reposted from Amnesty International
Families forcibly evicted, 100 more at risk 

Around 60 families have been forcibly evicted from their homes in an informal settlement in the area of Titanyen on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti. A further 100 families face a similar threat. Many of them are victims of the January 2010 earthquake who had already been forcibly evicted from their makeshift camp in May 2012.

Rapid Response Network Calls for Solidarity with Garment Workers in Haiti against Wage Theft and Exploitation!

November 27, 2013

Cross-posted from One Struggle

By organizers for the Rapid Response Network

“We start work at six o’clock. We finish at five. We don’t have time to eat because we cannot meet the quota. The pants, the T-shirts—we are the ones producing them. We labor hard, and we don’t get paid.”
– Manuel (Union of Textile & Apparel Workers – Batay Ouvriye).

Human Rights Lawyers Urge International Human Rights Commission to Denounce Pattern of Threats and Intimidation against Lawyers in Haiti

November 6, 2013

Cross-posted from IJDH

(WASHINGTON D.C., November 4, 2013) — The International Association of Democratic Lawyers (IADL), Bureau des Avocats Internationaux (BAI) and the Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti (IJDH) met with representatives from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) today to ask them to denounce an escalating pattern of threats and intimidation against lawyers and judges in Haiti.

Haiti: Uruguay Will Withdraw from MINUSTAH, President Says Beginning of End of UN Occupation of Haiti?

November 6, 2013

Cross-posted from Global Research

By Kim Ives

Following a visit earlier this month from Haitian Sen. Moïse Jean-Charles, Uruguay’s President José Mujica told a council of ministers on Oct. 28 that he would withdraw Uruguayan troops from the United Nations Mission to Stabilize Haiti (MINUSTAH), the 9,000 soldier force which has militarily occupied Haiti since June 2004.

Fault Lines: Views across Haiti’s Divide

October 29, 2013

Cross Posted from Focus on Haiti by Nic Johnson

At the launch of Beverly Bell’s new book Fault Lines: Views across Haiti’s Divide last Sunday, I joined a group of more than thirty devoted readers, supporters, and colleagues overflowing the bustling back room of The Coupe in Washington, D.C. The book surveys the conditions in displaced persons camps, shantytowns, and rural villages in the year following the 2010 earthquake, but what makes the book truly unique is Bell’s use of street journalism and personal experiences to report sentiments at a local level.

Apartheid in the Americas: Are you Haitian?

October 27, 2013

Cross-posted from Myriam Chancy

The implications of the ruling of September 23 by the Constitutional Tribunal of the Dominican Republic, stripping citizenship from the offspring of non-resident Haitians born in the Dominican Republic, where nationality is conferred “jus soli,” by place of birth, are only beginning to be understood by the international community with the OAS, Amnesty International, and the governments of Trinidad & Tobago, Guyana, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, openly condemning the violation of human rights it represents.  Hanging in the balance are the lives of nearly a quarter of a million Dominicans of Haitian descent–of all ages–who have been rendered stateless by the ruling, in what has been deemed a human rights crisis in the making.

Dominicans of Haitian Descent Cast Into Legal Limbo by Court

October 27, 2013

Cross-posted from the New York Times


SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic — For generations, people of Haitian descent have been an inextricable part of life here, often looked at with suspicion and dismay, but largely relied on all the same to clean rooms, build things cheaply and provide the backbreaking labor needed on the country’s vast sugar plantations.


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