Indigenous Territory & Resource Rights

We Are All Indigenous & We Are fighting For a Parliamentary Commission of Inquiry

October 27, 2015

Together to build a fair and supportive Brazil

The social and union movements from Mato Grosso do Sul, who got together last September 22nd , reaffirm their full support to indigenous peoples’ struggle for their rights, such as the battle to reclaim their territory and at least the chance of a fair and decent life. Once again, outraged, we denounce that in our Mato Grosso do Sul some of the farmers and their roughnecks have been working with some armed organizations and in less than a month they effected 12 (twelve) paramilitary attacks against Guarani Kaiowá, Tekohá Ñanderú Maragantú, Potrero Guasu, Guyra Kamby'I, Pyelito Kue and Kurupi. As a result of this war, Semião Vilhalva,  Guarani Kaiowá’s leader, was murdered and three Indians were shot. Many others were injured by some rubber bullets, while others were beaten up. 


A Tale of Two Food Prizes

October 12, 2015

By Eric Holt-Giménez, Executive Director of Food First

An OFRANEH youth brigade member waters sweet chili pepper in a family garden. Photos by Steve Pavey.

What’s in a prize? The politics of distribution versus growth.

On October 14th in Des Moines, Iowa, the Food Sovereignty Prize will be awarded to the Federation of Southern Cooperatives, run by African-American farmers of the southern United States and to OFRANEH—the Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras (Organización Fraternal Negra Hondureña).


Defending Afro-Indigenous Land: Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras Wins 2015 U.S. Food Sovereignty Prize

October 6, 2015

By Beverly Bell

Garifuna youth brigade members remove a fence post in the area planted by narco invaders of the land prior to the 2012 land recovery. Photo courtesy of Steve Pavey.

In 2015, the US Food Sovereignty Prize honors the Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras (OFRANEH by its Spanish acronym), Afro-indigenous farmers and fisherpeople who are defending their lands, waters, agriculture, and way of life. The Federation of Southern Cooperatives, primarily African-American farmers across 13 states in the deep South, shares the prize, which will be presented in Des Moines on October 14, 2015.

The prize is given by the US Food Sovereignty Alliance, which is comprised of groups of advocates, activists, and farmers and other food producers. Food sovereignty asserts that people everywhere must reclaim their control over food systems. The US Food Sovereignty Alliance upholds the right to food as a basic human right, and connects local, national, and international movements for systems change.

Below are excerpts from an interview with Miriam Miranda, coordinator of OFRANEH. OFRANEH works with the 46 Afro-indigenous Garífuna communities of the nation to defend their lands, agriculture, fishing, other riches of nature, identity, and rights.

Berta Cáceres, Honduran Indigenous Leader, Wins Goldman Prize

April 20, 2015

From Other Worlds' latest Newsletter April 20, 2015:

Berta Cáceres Receives Goldman Prize | 250 Years Later, Haitians Still Fighting for Rights to Their Land | Other Worlds Cafe | Ayiti Resurrect

Berta Caceres and the people of Rio Blanco set up a road blockade to prevent DESA's access to the dam site. For well over a year, they withstood multiple eviction attempts and violent attacks from militarized security contractors and the Honduran armed forces. (Photo Credit: Goldman Environmental Prize)

Today, the Goldman Environmental Prize - the most prestigious environmental award in the world - honors our dear sister Berta Cáceres and the fight for indigenous lands and participatory democracy in Honduras.

Cherán K’eri: Political parties are dead to us in this town

April 10, 2015

In April, the Purépecha municipality of Cherán K’eri, Michoacán is celebrating four years of its uprising to end organized crime in its territory.

By: El Enemigo Común

Cross-posted from Indibay

Originally released on Thursday Feb 12th, 2015 3:07 PM


In April of this year, the Purépecha municipality of Cherán K’eri, Michoacán is celebrating four years of its uprising to end the presence of organized crime in its territory. Following the uprising, indigenous women and men not only managed to throw out to the narco cartel, but also expelled all authorities (police, local government and political parties) that supported the illegal activities in the community. They decided to retake their traditional forms of self government to start a long process of building their autonomy. A few months back they inaugurated a new weapon to continue defending their traditions and reaffirm their rejection of the institutional political method: a communal television.



The First Global Festival for Anti-Capitalist Resistance and Rebellion

January 30, 2015

The First Global Festival for Anti-Capitalist Resistance and Rebellion


reposted from Counterpunch, January 26, 2015

Organized by the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) and the National Indigenous Congress (CNI), the first annual Festival Mundial de las Resistencias y Rebeldías contra el Capitalismo, or the Global Festival for Anti-Capitalist Resistance and Rebellion, was held in central and southern Mexico over a two-week period at the end of 2014 and beginning of 2015. The event’s subtitle sums up its purpose well: “While those from above destroy, those from below rebuild.”

EZLN: On Ayotzinapa, the Festival, and Hysteria as Analysis

December 19, 2014

By Subcomandante Insurgente Moisés, Zapatista Army for National Liberation

Cross-posted from Enlace Zapatista

On Ayotzinapa, the Festival, and Hysteria as a Method of Analysis and Guide for Action


To the compas of the National and International Sixth:

To the National Indigenous Congress:

To the family members and compañeros of those killed and disappeared in Ayotzinapa:

Sisters and brothers:

Compañeros and compañeras:

There are many things we want to tell you. We won’t tell you all of them because we know right now there are more urgent and important issues for all of us.[i] Thus we ask for your patience and your attentive ear.


December 9, 2014

By Stephen Bartlett, Agricultural Missions and US Food Sovereignty Alliance, and Beverly Bell, Other Worlds

Photos by Steve Pavey

December 10, 2014

Honduras is the country with the highest level of homicide of any nation not at war, where government violence and human rights abuses have almost total impunity. It is also the country contributing most of the flood of children who have been recently forced to migrate to the US, because of that violence and by poverty – both, in part, a legacy of US policy in the region.

Yet something else is afoot. A fierce social movement, composed of many sectors, is pushing back to protect democracy, lives, and political rights. Indigenous peoples, including Garifuna, Lenca, Pech, Miskito, Maya Chortí, and Tolupan, are asserting their human right to autonomy, territory, and cultural survival.

Palm Oil and Extreme Violence in Honduras: The Inexorable Rise and Dubious Reform of Grupo Dinant

December 8, 2014

By Jeff Conant, Truthout (Reprinted with permission)

December 8, 2014

As one of the fastest growing global commodities, palm oil has recently earned a reputation as a major contributor to tropical deforestation and, therefore, to climate change as well.

About 50 million metric tons of palm oil is produced per year - more than double the amount produced a decade ago - and this growth appears likely to continue for the foreseeable future. Because oil palm trees, native to West Africa, require the same conditions as tropical rainforests, nearly every drop of palm oil that hits the global market comes at the expense of natural forests that have been, or will be, burned, bulldozed and replaced with plantations.

... But what is being left behind is the other significant impact of palm oil and other agro-industrial commodities - namely human rights. Commitments to protect forests and conservation areas can, if well implemented, address environmental concerns by delimiting the areas of land available for conversion to palm oil. But natural resource exploitation is inextricably linked to human exploitation, and such commitments do little to address this.


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