Women's Rights and Gender Justice

"We are going to bring Berta’s legacy to life" - Berta Cáceres Lives Honduran Popular Alliance

April 11, 2016

Berta Cáceres Lives Honduran Popular Alliance moves towards unity and sets an agenda of struggle 

[Original en Español]

Reposted from Honduras Resists

By Giorgio Trucchi

April 10, 2016

Tegucigalpa, Honduras April 9th, 2016 Photo by Giorgio Trucchi

In a packed room, grassroots social movements who make up the Berta Cáceres Popular Alliance met this April 9th to initiate a path towards unity, towards building principles to guide an agenda of struggle by organized sectors of the Honduran people.

Women of COPINH: After more than 500 years of resistance we are the legitimate authorities

April 11, 2016

Statement from the Women of COPINH

Reposted from Honduras Resists, COPINH

[Original en español]

The women of the Civil Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) are speaking up today about the occupation we are carrying out at the Attorney General’s building in the city of Tegucigalpa.

Development banks need to wake up to the human rights crisis in Honduras

March 24, 2016

Reposted from the Guardian

Originally Shared on March 20, 2016

By Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein

The murder of activists opposed to the Agua Zarca dam project is a powerful reminder that financiers must take responsibility for safeguarding local people

Shortly after midnight on 3 March, Berta Cáceres was murdered by gunmenin her brother’s home. Cáceres was a woman of rare courage and principle, leader of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organisations of Honduras (Copinh), winner of the 2015 Goldman environmental prize, and led the resistance against the Agua Zarca hydroelectric dam on the Gualcarque river. The dam, which is reportedly being constructed without the consent of indigenous communities, threatens to disrupt their livelihoods and access to water.

INTERVIEW WITH BERTA CÁCERES: “TO FIGHT AGAINST REPRESSION IN HONDURAS IS TO FIGHT FOR OUR WHOLE CONTINENT”

March 23, 2016

By Beverly Bell

Photo credit: Roger Harris.

Below is a never-before-published interview with international social movement leader and Honduran indigenous organizer Berta Cáceres, who was assassinated on March 3, 2016. The interview was taken in Havana on September 4, 2009, two months after Honduran President Manuel Zelaya was overthrown in a US-backed coup d’état, while the unelected regime was still on a rampage to destroy resistance and the activists behind it. Cáceres’ murder has brought the overthrow of the last legitimately elected government to rule that country back into the global spotlight, because that overthrow laid the groundwork for the repression that now engulfs grassroots justice movements.

Cáceres’ message in the interview was clear: Pay attention. Stand up with and for us. Our fates are connected, and what happens to us can happen to you.

“What’s past is prologue,” Shakespeare said. Today, an unelected regime is again attempting to destroy resistance and the activists behind it. Berta’s message is as relevant to the Americas and the US now as then.

250 + Organizations Signed This Open Letter to Secretary of State John Kerry regarding the Murder of Honduran Indigenous and Environmental Activist Berta Cáceres

March 17, 2016

Reposted from Latin America Working Group

Originally shared March 10, 2016

[Download this letter as a PDF. ]
[Para leer la carta en español, haga clic aquí.]

Dear Secretary of State Kerry,

We write in shock and deep sorrow regarding the murder of Honduran human rights and environmental defender Berta Cáceres, founder and general secretary of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH). We urge a response from the State Department that is not business as usual but a profound change of direction towards improving the abysmal situation of human rights in Honduras.

Stop the Raids and Focus Instead on U.S. Policy towards Central America

January 19, 2016

Reposted from CIP Americas Program

Originally shared on January 11, 2016

Image from Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador.

Over the last few days, agents from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) have been rounding up and deporting dozens of members of Central American families seeking refuge from extreme violence and dire economic conditions in their communities of origin.  Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson has described the move as part of an effort to “secure” the U.S. border and has announced that “additional enforcement operations such as these will continue to occur as appropriate.”

The Mothers of Mexico’s Disappeared Organize in the Face of State Violence

November 10, 2015

Reosted from CIP Americas

Originally released on November 6, 2015

By Nidia Bautista 

Captura-de-pantalla-2015-10-02-a-las-11.25.14-662x381Held just four days after the one-year anniversary of the Ayotzinapa disappearances, at least three hundred people attended the International Forum on Disappearances in Mexico in Mexico City from Sept. 29 to Oct. 1, 2015. Social organizations and the Autonomous Metropolitan University Campus Xochimilco brought together families of disappeared persons, human rights activists, government officials, academics, journalists and students for three days of presentations and discussion around the crisis of disappearances in Mexico. Among the participants were dozens of mothers of some of the over 26,000 thousand people who have disappeared since 2006.

When Words Cost Lives

January 6, 2015

By Carol Polsgrove

Carol Polsgrove on Writers' Lives

I came across El Sonar de las Mujeres de la Tierra y el Mar in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico, in a store featuring memorabilia of the Zapatista rebellion: tee-shirts, posters, cards but also books, among them this one, pointed out to me by the man behind the counter, Tim Russo.

GENDERING PEASANT MOVEMENTS, GENDERING FOOD SOVEREIGNTY

November 4, 2014

"What peasant and grassroots women want is to build a feminism pertinent to their realities." -Pamela Caro. Photo Credit: Pamela Caro.A problem peasant women face is invisibility in the feminist and women’s movements. A second problem is the weakness with which the food sovereignty concept has dealt with the challenges of feminism.  

To take the second problem first: Latin America has assumed the struggle for food sovereignty as an alternative to the neoliberal economic model. Food sovereignty is based on the conviction that each people has the right to make decisions about its own food systems: about its own eating habits; about its production, marketing, distribution, exchange, and sharing; and about keeping food and seeds in the public sphere. If we establish that food sovereignty is how people decide what to produce and under what conditions, our question from a feminist point of view is, then: how do people make decisions? Who decides how power is organized? Probably, in reality we’ll see that peasant women are in secondary roles in decision-making areas. 

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