Women's Rights and Gender Justice

GENDERING PEASANT MOVEMENTS, GENDERING FOOD SOVEREIGNTY

November 4, 2014

"What peasant and grassroots women want is to build a feminism pertinent to their realities." -Pamela Caro. Photo Credit: Pamela Caro.A problem peasant women face is invisibility in the feminist and women’s movements. A second problem is the weakness with which the food sovereignty concept has dealt with the challenges of feminism.  

To take the second problem first: Latin America has assumed the struggle for food sovereignty as an alternative to the neoliberal economic model. Food sovereignty is based on the conviction that each people has the right to make decisions about its own food systems: about its own eating habits; about its production, marketing, distribution, exchange, and sharing; and about keeping food and seeds in the public sphere. If we establish that food sovereignty is how people decide what to produce and under what conditions, our question from a feminist point of view is, then: how do people make decisions? Who decides how power is organized? Probably, in reality we’ll see that peasant women are in secondary roles in decision-making areas. 

Strange Fruit: India’s Caste Culture is a Rape Culture

June 24, 2014

A Dalit woman explains how the caste system is a lethal one where, according to India’s National Crime Records Bureau, four Dalit women are raped, two Dalits are murdered, and two Dalit homes are torched every day.

This past week, the world mourned with a town called Baduan in Uttar Pradesh, India.  There the raped bodies of two young girls were found hanging in a mango tree while behind them their grim families refused to leave until justice was done. And as the news cycle ran statements from International NGOs, UN Officials, and pundits, there was no denying that the rotting smell of India’s strange fruit had come front and center to the world stage.  

U.S. Has No Plans for Leniency With Unaccompanied Migrant Children

June 24, 2014

Cross posted from Color Lines
By: Julianne Hing

Migrants fleeing Central America for the U.S. will not be greeted with open arms, the Obama administration wants to make clear. In fact, to deal with the influx of an expected 90,000 migrants this year, the Obama administration will be funneling immigration officers and judges to the region to accelerate processing—and deportations—of migrants, reports the New York Times.

“Back to the Grassroots”: Building a Movement for Sexual and Economic Rights

May 7, 2014

By Anne Lim, interviewed by Deepa Panchang
 


2014 International Women's Day community pride march in Quezon City, where GALANG works. The banner slogan roughly translates to “Human Rights: No More. No Less. Equal Rights!” Photo courtesy of GALANG.
 

Anne Lim is from Quezon City, Philippines, where she serves as Executive Director of GALANG, a lesbian-led organization that works with urban poor LBTs (lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people) in the city. She was recently nominated for the 2014 Baldwin Award, which recognizes human rights work outside the U.S. Anne gave this interview during the last Association for Women’s Rights in Development conference in Istanbul.
 

I'm Anne Lim and I'm a lesbian rights activist. Currently I’m running an organization called GALANG Philippines. Galang is the Filipino word for respect. We work to build leadership capacities of lesbians in metropolitan Manila, doing advocacy and forming LBT people’s organizations.

“Back to the Grassroots”: Building a Movement for Sexual and Economic Rights (Full Interview)

May 7, 2014

By Anne Lim, interviewed by Deepa Panchang

Full interview (shorter version here).

Anne Lim is from Quezon City, Philippines, where she serves as Executive Director of GALANG, a lesbian-led organization that works with urban poor LBTs (lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people) in the city. She was recently nominated for the 2014 Baldwin Award, which recognizes human rights work outside the U.S. Anne gave this interview during the last Association for Women’s Rights in Development conference in Istanbul.
 

I'm Anne Lim from the Philippines and I'm a lesbian rights activist. It's an identity I embrace because I feel that it's the aspect of my life that's caused me the most pain. That sounds a bit dramatic but…I think this is something I share in common with many lesbians in my country.

Nobel Women's Initiative: Spotlighting Berta Cáceres Flores, Honduras

November 19, 2013

Cross-posted from Nobel Women's Initiative

“Women have been resisting, defending our lives, our bodies, our territories, our culture, our spirituality, our autonomy because we desire not only territorial autonomy and autonomy for this country, we want autonomy for our bodies, for individuals, for the sovereignty of the body of people. “

Meet Berta Cáceres Flores.

The BAI denounces religious leaders’ march against Haiti’s LGBT community

August 7, 2013

(Port-au-Prince, July 17, 2013) - As countries around the world acknowledge the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals to marry and be free from violence and discrimination, religious leaders in Haiti are organizing a march against homosexuality. 

IACHR Condemns Recent Wave of Violence against LGTBI Persons in Haiti

July 30, 2013

July 30, 2013

Washington, D.C. – The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) condemns the recent wave of violence against lesbians, gays, trans, bisexual and intersex persons (LGTBI) in Haiti, allegedly linked to a march against homosexuality led by the Haitian Coalition of Religious and Moral Organizations (Coalition Haïtienne des organisations religieuses et morales) that took place on July 19, 2013 in Port-au-Prince. The Commission urges the Haitian government to investigate and take urgent and effective measures to stop these acts of violence and discrimination.

Pages

Subscribe to Women's Rights and Gender Justice