Alternatives

Check out these articles by and about our allies, who are creating vibrant grassroots alternatives everyday.

Reconstruction or Haiti’s Latest Disaster? Tourism Development on Île-à-Vache Island

July 21, 2014

 

The following is adapted from a presentation by Jessica Hsu of Other Worlds and Jean Claudy Aristil of Radio VKM Les Cayes at the Executive Symposium for Innovators in Coastal Tourism conference in St. Georges, Grenada held from July 8 - July 11, 2014.

 

A large-scale tourism project planned for the Haitian island of Île-à-Vache targets “the well-heeled tourist from traditional markets…creating a place of exquisite peace and well-being,” as described in the government of Haiti’s executive plan. The project aims to attract four character types: “the Explorers, the Lovers, the Rejuvenators and the Homecomers.” The corporations behind the project intend to build 1,500 hotels and bungalows along the island’s beaches, an international airport, a golf course, island farms, and tourist “villages” with cafes, shops, and night clubs.

THE RICHES OF NATURE V. PRIVATE PROPERTY: AN INTERVIEW WITH GERARDO CERDAS

July 1, 2014

By Beverly Bell

July 1, 2014


Gerardo Cerdas with the next generation of humanity. 

Gerardo Cerdas is coordinator of the Latin American- and Caribbean-wide social movement Grito de los Excluidos, Cry of the Excluded. He is also a sociologist and researcher. A native of Costa Rica, Cerdas lives in Brazil.

All the peoples of the world, without exception - except for modern culture - have always based their material culture on the concept that property is communally owned. Property – land, food, etc. - was always shared. This has been the case for tribal, nomadic societies and for other, more politically developed societies in different parts of the world. Private property, as something natural and inviolable, is a product of history, and as such can be stripped down to its roots, and more importantly, can be modified within a utopian vision integrated into our political practice. 

Strange Fruit: India’s Caste Culture is a Rape Culture

June 24, 2014

A Dalit woman explains how the caste system is a lethal one where, according to India’s National Crime Records Bureau, four Dalit women are raped, two Dalits are murdered, and two Dalit homes are torched every day.

This past week, the world mourned with a town called Baduan in Uttar Pradesh, India.  There the raped bodies of two young girls were found hanging in a mango tree while behind them their grim families refused to leave until justice was done. And as the news cycle ran statements from International NGOs, UN Officials, and pundits, there was no denying that the rotting smell of India’s strange fruit had come front and center to the world stage.  

Detroit activists call for UN help as city shuts off water for thousands

June 24, 2014

Cross-posted from Al Jazeera.

City's water utility keeps raising rates as it falls further into debt; nearly half of customers are behind on payments

June 22, 2014 12:51PM ET

Detroit has too much of some things – stray dogsabandoned houses – and not enough of others, such as residents who pay their water bills.

The latest sign of Detroit’s decline came from the city’s water department, when it said in March it would begin shutting off water for up to 3,000 homes and businesses a week in an attempt to stop the utility from sliding even further into debt.

U.S. Has No Plans for Leniency With Unaccompanied Migrant Children

June 24, 2014

Cross posted from Color Lines
By: Julianne Hing

Migrants fleeing Central America for the U.S. will not be greeted with open arms, the Obama administration wants to make clear. In fact, to deal with the influx of an expected 90,000 migrants this year, the Obama administration will be funneling immigration officers and judges to the region to accelerate processing—and deportations—of migrants, reports the New York Times.

Fracking- What is Fracking and Why Should It Be Banned?

June 18, 2014

Cross-posted from Food and Water Watch

By Food and Water Watch

The case to ban fracking  grows stronger every day. Fracking is short for hydraulic fracturing. It’s a water-intensive process where millions of gallons of fluid — a mix of water, sand, and chemicals, including ones known to cause cancer — are injected underground at high pressure to fracture the rock surrounding an oil or gas well. This releases extra oil and gas from the rock, so it can flow into the well.

Food and Water Watch: Superbugs Get Started on Factory Farms

June 17, 2014

Cross-posted from Food and Water Watch.

By Jo Miles

You’ve probably heard about the rise of antibiotic-resistant infections: bacteria that have grown increasingly resistant to medicine. It’s a serious threat… yet not many people realize that factory farms are a huge part of the problem. 

Check out the comic below to see how factory farms are putting everyone’s health at risk. Then tell your lawmakers to stop the misuse of antibiotics on factory farms.

RAISING HOPE ACROSS BORDERS: TRANSNATIONAL SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND POWER

June 17, 2014

An interview with Gerardo Cerdas by Beverly Bell

June 17, 2014


Last gathering of the cross-border Cry of the Excluded movement, in indigenous lands in Honduras, with participants from 10 countries in the Americas. Cerdas is on far right in the yellow shirt. 

Gerardo Cerdas is coordinator of the Latin American- and Caribbean-wide social movement Grito de los Excluidos, Cry of the Excluded. He is also a sociologist and researcher. A native of Costa Rica, Cerdas lives in Brazil.

What’s the Role of Race in the New Economy Movement?

June 16, 2014
Cross-posted from YES! Magazine.

For the movement to succeed, it must be led by the dispossessed—those for whom the mainstream economy has never worked.
 

posted Jun 10, 2014

photo by Stephen Melkisethian

Fast food worker strike in Wheaton, Maryland. Food service jobs are among the worst-paid and lowest-quality in the country and have been a recent focus of social justice movements. December 15, 2013. Photo by Stephen Melkisethian.

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