Articles

On Coup Anniversary, Examining the US Role in Honduras

July 6, 2016

By Pamela Spees

Reposted from Common Dreams

Originally posted on June 28, 2016

In this handout picture released by the Guatemalan Presidency, Hondura’s President Porfirio Lobo talks with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton in Guatemala City on March 5, 2010. (Photo: Guatemala Presidency/Handout)

Today marks seven years since the coup d’etat in Honduras – the day that former President Manuel Zelaya was kidnapped by the Honduran army and then flown out of the country from an air field controlled by the U.S. military. That event sent shockwaves through the region and the world and was denounced by the United Nations, the Organization of American States (OAS), and the European Union. Honduras was suspended temporarily from the OAS.

State Department Turns Blind Eye to Evidence of Honduran Military’s Activist Kill List

June 29, 2016

By Alex Emmons

Reposted from the Intercept

Originally posted on June 23, 2016

Soldiers and policemen are deployed in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, next to a blockade. Photo: Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

STATE DEPARTMENT SPOKESPERSON John Kirby on Wednesday repeatedly denied that the government of Honduras kills its own citizens, saying more than a dozen times that he has not heard “credible evidence” of “deaths ordered by the military.”

Berta Cáceres's name was on Honduran military hitlist, says former soldier

June 27, 2016

A unit trained by US special forces was ordered to kill the environmental activist who was slain in March, according to an ex-member who now fears for his life

By Nina Lakhani

Reposted from the Guardian

Originally posted on June 21, 2016

One human rights expert said: ‘This … reinforces calls that the US must withdraw military aid from Honduras where there’s been a bloodbath since the 2009 coup.’ Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Berta Cáceres, the murdered environmental campaigner, appeared on a hitlist distributed to US-trained special forces units of the Honduran military months before her death, a former soldier has claimed.

Stop the Repression of Oaxaca's Teachers Union

June 22, 2016

Urgent Call for Solidarity with Oaxaca’s Teachers Union

Reposted from Alliance for Global Justice

Originally posted on June 21, 2016

The Alliance for Global Justice denounces the brutal repression on June 19, 2016 against striking teachers in Oaxaca, Mexico that has left 12 teachers and students dead. They were killed by federal, state and local police who fired on unarmed, nonviolent demonstrators. According to a report by Telesur, the dead include 10 in Nochixtlan, one in Hacienda Blanca and one in Juchitán. Many persons have been wounded, and at least 23 persons disappeared. Witnesses report that wounded protesters and civillians were being turned away from the hospital at Nochixtlan, only police officers being admitted.

US HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES INTRODUCES BERTA CÁCERES HUMAN RIGHTS IN HONDURAS ACT

June 15, 2016

BREAKING NEWS: The BERTA CÁCERES HUMAN RIGHTS IN HONDURAS ACT (H.R. 5474) has just been introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives, demanding a suspension of all U.S. military and police aid to Honduras!! This important bill is introduced on the Global Day of Action for Justice for Berta!

Report Details How US-Backed Coup Unleashed Wave of Abuses in Honduras

June 14, 2016

Survey by 54 civil society organizations and social movements presented to UN as alternative to official state report

By Lauren McCauley

Reposted from Common Dreams

Originally posted on June 7, 2016

Before her assassination, Honduran Indigenous leader Berta Cáceres criticized U.S. presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton as an example of international "meddling." (Photo via Democracy Now!)

The U.S.-backed Honduran coup ushered in a wave of neoliberal policies that have systematically violated the economic, cultural, and social rights of the nation's Indigenous people, women, and farmers, while leaving activists and rights defenders—such as the late Berta Cáceres—vulnerable to criminalization and violence.

Brazil’s largest hydroelectric dam project suspended by Indigenous action

June 7, 2016

By Robert A. Vigna 

Cross-posted from Grassroots International

Originally posted on May 6, 2016

April has been an exceptional month for Indigenous groups in Brazil.

On April 19th, which happens to be Indigenous people’s day in Brazil, Ibama, the Brazilian Institute of the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, suspended the license of one of the biggest hydroelectric dam projects in Brazil, São Luiz do Tapajós in the Amazon, which was to be started this year. The company building the dam was planning on flooding about 7% of the Mundruku peoples land, which would be unconstitutional once the indigenous status of land is confirmed.  

GLOBAL ACTION FOR JUSTICE FOR BERTA CÁCERES JUNE 15th

June 6, 2016

A Call to Action From COPINH

Reposted from Honduras Resists

Orginally posted May 24, 2016

[For a list of embassies, see this post on School of the Americas Watch]

To the grassroots social movements, organizations and civil society around the world:

The death of Berta Cáceres has filled us with indignation. We carry the pain with us, but we also carry the strength of her thought, her work, and the longing for justice. The principles that she fought for are what will save humanity, which is why we call on you to participate in a worldwide protest that will bring all of our voices together to demand justice for Berta Cáceres, justice for Gustavo Castro, justice for COPINH and justice for the people of Honduras.

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