Articles

India's Barefoot College lights up the world

March 6, 2015

College helps to bring electricity to villages around the globe by training poor women to be solar engineers.

By: Shweta Desai

Cross-posted from: Al Jazeera

Originally released on January 15, 2014

Women solar engineers in each of 43 Least Developed Countries will receive training at the college by 2015 [Shweta Desai]

 

 

Living in a palm-lined thatched roof house surrounded by dense jungles and rows of corn and cassava in the Santa Teresa village, 42-year-old Florentine until now has spent all her evenings in the dark, literally.

But today, sitting in the dusty village of Tilonia in Rajasthan India, the Mayan woman is lighting the first sparks, which three months from now will bring electricity for the first time in her hometown in Toldeo in Latin America’s Belize.

Meet Yacouba Sawadogo – The Man Who Stopped the Desert

March 2, 2015

By: Sumitra

Cross-posted from OddityCentral

Originally released on January 20th, 2014

Photo: Andrea Borgarello/TerrAfrica

 

 

Yacouba Sawadogo is an exceptional man – he single-handedly managed to solve a crisis that even scientists and development organizations could not. The simple old farmer’s re-forestation and soil conservation techniques are so effective they’ve helped turn the tide in the fight against the desertification of the harsh lands in northern Burkina Faso.

Gratiferias: The Market Where Everything is Free

February 28, 2015

By: Julie Liardet

Cross-posted from WorldCrunch

Originally released on September 09, 2012

 

GENEVA - People strolling, music, smiles, bursts of laughter. Customers walk between clothes and trinkets, homegrown zucchini and children's games, spread on tables or on the ground. A neighbor has brought his electric razor; another has just found a book by French sociologist Marcel Mauss

 

World Bank Refuses to Consider Haitian Communities’ Complaint about New Mining Law

February 26, 2015

By Center for human rights and global justice nyu school of law

Reposted from http://chrgj.org/world-bank-refuses-to-consider-haitian-communities-complaint-about-new-mining-law/ on February 26, 2015.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

World Bank Refuses to Consider Haitian Communities’ Complaint about New Mining Law
Complaint Office Recognizes “Legitimate” Concerns, Rejects Complaint on Technical Grounds

(NEW YORK, SAN FRANCISCO, PORT-AU-PRINCE Feb. 17, 2015)—Last week, the World Bank Inspection Panel refused to consider a complaint from Haitian communities about the Bank’s support for development of the mining sector in Haiti.  Communities affected by mining activity and the Justice in Mining Collective, a group of six Haitian civil society organizations, submitted the complaint in early January, alleging violations of their rights to information and participation and threats of human rights abuses and environmental harms.  The Inspection Panel—an office established to address complaints from people affected by World Bank-sponsored projects—recognized that the complaint raised “serious and legitimate” concerns and that the mining industry presents significant risks.  The office nevertheless denied the complaint on narrow, technical grounds.  The complainants expect to receive a copy of the decision in French today.[1]

 

We're Young, Passionate, and Bent on Justice: Why #BlackLivesMatter Is Irresistible

February 24, 2015

By Adrienne Maree Brown

Reposted from http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/together-with-earth/were-young-passionate-and-bent-on-justice-why-black-lives-matter-is-irresistible on February 24, 2015.

Millions March NYC, December 2014. Photo by B.C. Lorio.

The people dying are moms and dads, kids and teenagers, nerdy, quiet boys and girls. This movement is showing what wholeness looks like and demanding a whole and uncompromised justice.

#BlackLivesMatter: Lessons from a Leader-ful Movement

February 17, 2015

By Jodie Tonita

Reposted from http://www.stproject.org/from-the-field/blacklivesmatter-lessons/ on February 19, 2015

In the 15 years that I have been supporting social change leaders to become more powerful, effective and collaborative I have never been as hopeful as I am today. A new civil rights movement with bold new leadership is emerging, and there is already a lot to be learned from these efforts, and much to celebrate.

A Herstory of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement

February 17, 2015

By Alicia Garza

Reposted from http://thefeministwire.com/2014/10/blacklivesmatter-2/ on February 17, 2015

I created #BlackLivesMatter with Patrisse Cullors and Opal Tometi, two of my sisters, as a call to action for Black people after 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was post-humously placed on trial for his own murder and the killer, George Zimmerman, was not held accountable for the crime he committed. It was a response to the anti-Black racism that permeates our society and also, unfortunately, our movements.
 

POWER TO THE PEOPLE, BUT REALLY: PARTICIPATORY DEMOCRACY IN EL SALVADOR

February 11, 2015

An interview with Congresswoman Estela Hernandez of El Salvador

By Beverly Bell

February 11, 2015

Estela Hernandez, congresswoman, social movement leader, and radical democracy advocate.

Estela Hernandez is both a member of the national assembly and a leader in the transformational social movement, La Coordinadora of the Lower Lempa and the Bay of Jiquilisco in rural El Salvador. Here, Hernandez talks about a radical vision and practice of direct, participatory democracy by the citizens in the government of the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front, or FMLN.  

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