Other Worlds

Peasant Agroecology, the key for humankind and the planet

December 16, 2014

Nyeleni Newsletter: December 2014

Released by Nyeleni

Peasant Agroecology, the key for humankind and the planet Agroecology has existed for many years, and much has been written about it already. It is a multidimensional approach, founded on knowledge, know-how and peasants’ ways of life, grounded in their respective natural, social and cultural environment. For many years it was considered as archaic and not really adapted to “modern progress”. Agroecology was banished, but is now making a big comeback. But who will reap the benefits?

ON INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS DAY, THE FIGHT FOR INDIGENOUS LAND AND AUTONOMY IN HONDURAS

December 10, 2014

By Stephen Bartlett, Agricultural Missions and US Food Sovereignty Alliance, and Beverly Bell, Other Worlds

Photos by Steve Pavey

December 10, 2014

Honduras is the country with the highest level of homicide of any nation not at war, where government violence and human rights abuses have almost total impunity. It is also the country contributing most of the flood of children who have been recently forced to migrate to the US, because of that violence and by poverty – both, in part, a legacy of US policy in the region.

Yet something else is afoot. A fierce social movement, composed of many sectors, is pushing back to protect democracy, lives, and political rights. Indigenous peoples, including Garifuna, Lenca, Pech, Miskito, Maya Chortí, and Tolupan, are asserting their human right to autonomy, territory, and cultural survival.

Cultivating Climate Justice through Compost: the Story of Hernani

December 9, 2014

This is part 4 of a four-part article series “Cultivating Climate Justice” which tells the stories of community groups on the frontlines of the pollution, waste and climate crises, working together for systems change. United across six continents, these grassroots groups are defending community rights to clean air, clean water, zero waste, environmental justice, and good jobs. They are all members of the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, a network of over 800 organizations from 90+ countries.

 

This series is produced by the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and Other Worlds.

 

Cultivating Climate Justice through Compost: the Story of Hernani

When the people of Hernani, Spain, began a residential compost system, they weren’t looking to become heroes of the movement for climate justice. Like thousands of other towns around the world, they were simply looking for an alternative to incineration and the pollution it brings.

Palm Oil and Extreme Violence in Honduras: The Inexorable Rise and Dubious Reform of Grupo Dinant

December 8, 2014

By Jeff Conant, Truthout (Reprinted with permission)

December 8, 2014

As one of the fastest growing global commodities, palm oil has recently earned a reputation as a major contributor to tropical deforestation and, therefore, to climate change as well.

About 50 million metric tons of palm oil is produced per year - more than double the amount produced a decade ago - and this growth appears likely to continue for the foreseeable future. Because oil palm trees, native to West Africa, require the same conditions as tropical rainforests, nearly every drop of palm oil that hits the global market comes at the expense of natural forests that have been, or will be, burned, bulldozed and replaced with plantations.

... But what is being left behind is the other significant impact of palm oil and other agro-industrial commodities - namely human rights. Commitments to protect forests and conservation areas can, if well implemented, address environmental concerns by delimiting the areas of land available for conversion to palm oil. But natural resource exploitation is inextricably linked to human exploitation, and such commitments do little to address this.

Tangled Roots and Bitter Fruit: What Ferguson can teach the food movement

December 3, 2014

By Eric Holt-Giménez, Food First

Cross-posted with permission from Food First

(November 29, 2014) The public outcry following the decision of the grand jury of St. Louis County, Missouri not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for killing Michael Brown reaches across color lines.

The rage and exasperation in the streets are just the tip of the iceberg. Beneath the protests sweeping the country, grief, sadness and disillusion are seeping into the hearts and minds of many people who may not be the target of police violence but who know a miscarriage of justice when they see it—over and over again. There is guilt and fear too, among those who sense the police have gone too far, too many times, and that the widespread militarization of our police forces since 9/11 is making us less, rather than more secure.

Help Haitian Family Farmers Keep Their Lands

December 2, 2014

Other Worlds is excited to announce the launch of our fundraiser for our Hatian land rights campaign on Global Giving!

Read on about our project and our fundraiser, and please consider a donation today!

All recurring monthly donations will be matched by an anonymous donor, so you can double your impact!  
On December 10, Global Giving will match all donations of $25 to $1,000 at 15%!
In order for our campaign to have a permanent spot on Global Giving, we must meet our $5,000 goal by December 31. Please make a donation to support Haitians in their struggle for their human rights and land rights today.

Summary

Family farmers across Haiti have joined together to protect their lands from theft by tourism corporations, mining, and seizure by large landholders. These farmers are some of the poorest and hungriest people in the world. Other Worlds supports Haitians in their struggle for their human rights and land rights through media, advocacy, education, legal defense, international support, and funds, so they can stay on their ancestral land, keep farming, and feed their children.
 

 

Cultivating Climate Justice: A Tale of Two Cities

December 2, 2014

This is part 3 of a four-part article series “Cultivating Climate Justice” which tells the stories of community groups on the frontlines of the pollution, waste and climate crises, working together for systems change. United across six continents, these grassroots groups are defending community rights to clean air, clean water, zero waste, environmental justice, and good jobs. They are all members of the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, a network of over 800 organizations from 90+ countries.

 

This series is produced by the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and Other Worlds.

Cultivating Climate Justice: A Tale of Two Cities

This is a tale of two U.S. cities building solutions to the climate crisis from the bottom up.

We start in the Northeast of the country, with Cooperative Energy, Recycling and Organics (CERO), a newly formed worker-owned cooperative in Boston, Massachusetts. While providing family-supporting jobs for the community, CERO works with businesses on separating out materials that can be recovered. They then collect this waste in a truck and bring it to facilities where it can either be recycled or returned to the soil as compost.

Food Chains: The Revolution in America's Fields

November 26, 2014

A new film has just been released highlighting the struggle and success of the farmworkers in Florida who are revolutionizing farm labor in the field: the Coalition of Immokalee Workers or CIW.

The film hit the theaters on November 21, 2014, and is now showing in select theaters for one week stretches. The San Francisco Premier is Saturday, November 28,

From Food Chains:

In this exposé, an intrepid group of Florida farmworkers battle to defeat the $4 trillion global supermarket industry through their ingenious Fair Food program, which partners with growers and retailers to improve working conditions for farm laborers in the United States.

Cultivating Climate Justice from the Frontlines of the Crisis: The Philippines and Australia

November 24, 2014

This is part 2 of a four-part article series “Cultivating Climate Justice” which tells the stories of community groups on the frontlines of the pollution, waste and climate crises, working together for systems change. United across six continents, these grassroots groups are defending community rights to clean air, clean water, zero waste, environmental justice, and good jobs. They are all members of the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, a network of over 800 organizations from 90+ countries.

This series is produced by the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and Other Worlds.

Cultivating Climate Justice from the Frontlines of the Crisis:

The Philippines and Australia

“To anyone who continues to deny the reality that is climate change.... I dare you to go to the islands of the Pacific, the islands of the Caribbean and the islands of the Indian Ocean and see the impacts of rising sea levels; to the mountainous regions of the Himalayas and the Andes to see communities confronting glacial floods, to the Arctic where communities grapple with the fast dwindling polar ice caps, to the large deltas of the Mekong, the Ganges, the Amazon, and the Nile where lives and livelihoods are drowned… And if that is not enough, you may want to pay a visit to the Philippines right now.” - Philippines lead negotiator Yeb Sano addressing the opening session of the UN climate summit in Warsaw, following Super Typhoon Haiyan in 2013

 

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