Other Worlds

FACING OFF: THE INTEGRATION OF CAPITAL V. THE INTEGRATION OF PEOPLES IN THE AMERICAS

July 22, 2013

from a speech by João Pedro Stédile,
Co-coordinator of the Landless Workers Movement of Brazil

Edited by Beverly Bell


João Pedro Stédile, second from left, speaks to the Peasant Movement of Papay in Haiti. Photo: Beverly Bell.

João Pedro Stédile is an economist, co-founder and co-coordinator of the Landless Workers Movement (MST) of Brazil, and leader among Latin American social movements. He gave the following talk to hundreds of Haitian farmers at the 40th anniversary assembly of the Peasant Movement of Papay (MPP) on March 18, 2013.

I’d like to bring to you the perspective of the Landless Workers Movement on this complex historic moment, and on the social movements we’re building in Latin America.

Other Worlds is seeking an intern!

July 17, 2013

Media & Outreach Internship Description
Summer/Fall 2013

*Accepting applications immediately

 

About Us

Other Worlds is a women-driven, multi-media education and movement-building collaborative. Other Worlds inspires hope and knowledge that another world is possible, and helps build it. We compile and bring to light political, economic, social, and environmental alternatives that are flourishing throughout the world, and inspire and help the public throughout the Americas open up new pathways to adapt and replicate them. We support the global movements that are propelling the alternatives. In the U.S., we seek to draw in new participants and strengthen existent efforts for economic justice, environmentally sound systems, and meaningful democracy.

“THE REVOLUTION IS GOING TO BE FOUGHT WITH THE HOE” AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT IN NEW MEXICO

July 17, 2013

By Tory Field and Beverly Bell

Part 20 of the Harvesting Justice series


Spring cleaning of the acequia that irrigates Sol Feliz farm. Acequias are a traditional irrigation system used through much of New Mexico, and managed democratically by the community. Photo by Miguel Santistevan.

“We’re surrounded by agricultural land but we have no food security. Right now we’re strapped to the global market,” said Miguel Santistevan, a New Mexican farmer and biologist. “Some people are trying to figure out how to set themselves free and are showing other people. It’s as if we were all tied to a train that’s headed off a cliff, and pretty soon a lot of us are saying, ‘Hey, I’m going to jump off this train before it goes.’

Meet Up, Eat Up, Act Up: Consumers Join the Movement for Food Workers’ Rights

July 17, 2013

By Tory Field and Beverly Bell

Part 19 of the Harvesting Justice series

“This is a muddler,” said Danielle, grinding mint into the bottom of a metal cup. With the straightforward demeanor of a good bartender, Danielle was explaining how to make a mojito.  But this was not just a fancy drink demo. After the cocktail, she talked with the audience about her working life at an upscale steakhouse chain restaurant, including the steady sexual harassment and the uneasy feeling of being viewed by management as a number more than a person.

BRINGING THE FOOD HOME: LOCAL FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS

July 17, 2013

By Tory Field and Beverly Bell

Part 16 of the Harvesting Justice series


In Santa Fe, New Mexico, one of a growing number of winter farmers’ markets. Photo: Tory Field.

In Western Massachusetts on a sunny winter day, a farmers’ market was taking place in the entryway of an elementary school. The smell was a mix of apple cider, homemade donuts, and gymnasium. Long rows of tables were heavy with piles of root vegetables, hardy apples, fresh pies, pasture-raised lamb, honey wine, and handmade brooms. There was enough diversity that, if determined and creative, one could make it through an admirable portion of a long northern winter.

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