Other Worlds

Communication and Social Change: Second World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters Conference in Port-au-Prince

July 30, 2013

Cross-posted from AMARC

The World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters (AMARC) and SAKS (Sosyete Animasyon Kominikasyon Sosyal ak), in collaboration with REFRAKA (Rezo Fanm Radyo Kominotè Ayisyen) and AMEKA (Asosyasyon Medya Kominotè Ayisyen), organized the second conference of community radio in the Caribbean on "Communication and Social Change" on July, 25 and 26, 2013 in Port au Prince, Haiti.

IACHR Condemns Recent Wave of Violence against LGTBI Persons in Haiti

July 30, 2013

July 30, 2013

Washington, D.C. – The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) condemns the recent wave of violence against lesbians, gays, trans, bisexual and intersex persons (LGTBI) in Haiti, allegedly linked to a march against homosexuality led by the Haitian Coalition of Religious and Moral Organizations (Coalition Haïtienne des organisations religieuses et morales) that took place on July 19, 2013 in Port-au-Prince. The Commission urges the Haitian government to investigate and take urgent and effective measures to stop these acts of violence and discrimination.

LAND TO THE TILLERS: RESPONSES TO LAND GRABS

July 29, 2013

By Tory Field and Beverly Bell
Deepa Panchang also co-authored this article.

Part 23 of the Harvesting Justice series


New York demonstrators supporting the Homes for All campaign for affordable housing, this July. Photo courtesy of Right to the City Alliance.

The outcome of last Sunday’s elections in Cambodia, in which Prime Minister Hun Sen hoped to extend his 28-year rule, is in dispute. Even if he continues in office, Hun Sen’s tight grip on civil society is threatened, in part, by public anger against land grabs. In the past decade, his government has handed 73% of Cambodia’s arable land, most of it belonging to small farmers, over to businesses.

Bev Bell interview on Pacifica's "Uprising"

July 26, 2013

Check out Bev's latest interview with Sonali Kolhatkar on Pacifica's "Uprising"!

Cross-posted from Uprising Radio.

Listen here.

We don’t often think about where our food really comes from. Tracing back last night’s dinner from our plates back to the hands that actually harvested our vegetables or the machines that slaughtered our meat, perhaps half a world away, provides a disturbing lesson about how our food supply is built.

Conventional foods that form the majority of our diets are grown elsewhere, often by impoverished workers, sprayed with pesticides or pumped with antibiotics, transported thousands of miles over land and sea using precious fossil fuel resources, packaged in plastic and set out on refrigerated store shelves before landing in our kitchens.

Along the way farmers get ripped off, multinational companies make huge profits, and consumers get gouged.

People are literally fed up, and have sparked a global movement to transform the politics of food – that movement is the subject of a new book by Tory Field and Beverly Bell called Harvesting Justice: Transforming Food, Land, and Agricultural Systems in the Americas.

GUEST: Beverly Bell, co-author with Tory Field of Harvesting Justice: Transforming Food, Land, and Agricultural Systems in the Americas

Find out more about the book at www.harvesting-justice.org.

- See more at: http://uprisingradio.org/home/2013/07/26/harvesting-justice-transforming...

Food for Body, Food for Thought, Food for Justice: People’s Grocery in Oakland, California

July 23, 2013

By Tory Field and Beverly Bell

Part 22 of the Harvesting Justice series

Deepa Panchang co-authored this article.


Photo courtesy of People’s Grocery

The neighborhood of West Oakland in California has long been without a large grocery store, let alone one that offers healthy, fresh food. With unemployment at about 10% and nearly half the population of 30,000 residents living at or below the poverty line, West Oakland is a neighborhood that grocery store chains have claimed isn’t able to sustain a full-functioning store.[1]

FACING OFF: THE INTEGRATION OF CAPITAL V. THE INTEGRATION OF PEOPLES IN THE AMERICAS

July 22, 2013

from a speech by João Pedro Stédile,
Co-coordinator of the Landless Workers Movement of Brazil

Edited by Beverly Bell


João Pedro Stédile, second from left, speaks to the Peasant Movement of Papay in Haiti. Photo: Beverly Bell.

João Pedro Stédile is an economist, co-founder and co-coordinator of the Landless Workers Movement (MST) of Brazil, and leader among Latin American social movements. He gave the following talk to hundreds of Haitian farmers at the 40th anniversary assembly of the Peasant Movement of Papay (MPP) on March 18, 2013.

I’d like to bring to you the perspective of the Landless Workers Movement on this complex historic moment, and on the social movements we’re building in Latin America.

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