Other Worlds

World Bank Refuses to Consider Haitian Communities’ Complaint about New Mining Law

February 26, 2015

By Center for human rights and global justice nyu school of law

Reposted from http://chrgj.org/world-bank-refuses-to-consider-haitian-communities-complaint-about-new-mining-law/ on February 26, 2015.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

World Bank Refuses to Consider Haitian Communities’ Complaint about New Mining Law
Complaint Office Recognizes “Legitimate” Concerns, Rejects Complaint on Technical Grounds

(NEW YORK, SAN FRANCISCO, PORT-AU-PRINCE Feb. 17, 2015)—Last week, the World Bank Inspection Panel refused to consider a complaint from Haitian communities about the Bank’s support for development of the mining sector in Haiti.  Communities affected by mining activity and the Justice in Mining Collective, a group of six Haitian civil society organizations, submitted the complaint in early January, alleging violations of their rights to information and participation and threats of human rights abuses and environmental harms.  The Inspection Panel—an office established to address complaints from people affected by World Bank-sponsored projects—recognized that the complaint raised “serious and legitimate” concerns and that the mining industry presents significant risks.  The office nevertheless denied the complaint on narrow, technical grounds.  The complainants expect to receive a copy of the decision in French today.[1]

 

We're Young, Passionate, and Bent on Justice: Why #BlackLivesMatter Is Irresistible

February 24, 2015

By Adrienne Maree Brown

Reposted from http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/together-with-earth/were-young-passionate-and-bent-on-justice-why-black-lives-matter-is-irresistible on February 24, 2015.

Millions March NYC, December 2014. Photo by B.C. Lorio.

The people dying are moms and dads, kids and teenagers, nerdy, quiet boys and girls. This movement is showing what wholeness looks like and demanding a whole and uncompromised justice.

#BlackLivesMatter: Lessons from a Leader-ful Movement

February 17, 2015

By Jodie Tonita

Reposted from http://www.stproject.org/from-the-field/blacklivesmatter-lessons/ on February 19, 2015

In the 15 years that I have been supporting social change leaders to become more powerful, effective and collaborative I have never been as hopeful as I am today. A new civil rights movement with bold new leadership is emerging, and there is already a lot to be learned from these efforts, and much to celebrate.

A Herstory of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement

February 17, 2015

By Alicia Garza

Reposted from http://thefeministwire.com/2014/10/blacklivesmatter-2/ on February 17, 2015

I created #BlackLivesMatter with Patrisse Cullors and Opal Tometi, two of my sisters, as a call to action for Black people after 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was post-humously placed on trial for his own murder and the killer, George Zimmerman, was not held accountable for the crime he committed. It was a response to the anti-Black racism that permeates our society and also, unfortunately, our movements.
 

POWER TO THE PEOPLE, BUT REALLY: PARTICIPATORY DEMOCRACY IN EL SALVADOR

February 11, 2015

An interview with Congresswoman Estela Hernandez of El Salvador

By Beverly Bell

February 11, 2015

Estela Hernandez, congresswoman, social movement leader, and radical democracy advocate.

Estela Hernandez is both a member of the national assembly and a leader in the transformational social movement, La Coordinadora of the Lower Lempa and the Bay of Jiquilisco in rural El Salvador. Here, Hernandez talks about a radical vision and practice of direct, participatory democracy by the citizens in the government of the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front, or FMLN.  

Radical Farmers Use Fresh Food to Fight Racial Injustice and the New Jim Crow

February 10, 2015

By Leah Penniman

Reposted from http://www.yesmagazine.org/peace-justice/radical-farmers-use-fresh-food-fight-racial-injustice-black-lives-matter on January 28, 2015

In August, five young men showed up at Soul Fire Farm, a sustainable farm near Albany, New York, where I work as educator and food justice coordinator. It was the first day of a new restorative justice program, in partnership with the county’s Department of Law. The teens had been convicted of theft, and, as an alternative to incarceration, chose this opportunity to earn money to pay back their victims while gaining farm skills. They looked wary and unprepared, with gleaming sneakers and averted eyes.

Haitian Communities File Complaint about World Bank- Supported Mining Law

February 5, 2015

By The Center for Human Rights and Global Justice, NYU School of Law

Reposted from http://chrgj.org/haitian-communities-file-complaint-about-world-bank-supported-mining-law/ on January 7, 2015

(NEW YORK, SAN FRANCISCO, PORT-AU-PRINCE Jan. 7, 2015)—Haitian communities and organizations filed a complaint with the World Bank regarding Bank-supported activities to develop Haiti’s mining sector today.[1]  The complaint alleges that the Haitian populace has been left out of World Bank-funded efforts by the Haitian government to draft new mining legislation intended to attract foreign investors to exploit Haiti’s gold and other minerals.  Complainants contend that the Bank has failed to follow its own social and environmental safeguard policies or ensure that the new legal framework adheres to international best practices.  They fear that allowing the mineral sector to develop without much-needed human rights and environmental protections and without public consultation could harm rather than help Haiti.

A Love Note to Our Folks: Alicia Garza on the Organizing of #BlackLivesMatter

January 30, 2015

By L.A. Kauffman

Reposted from N+1 on January 20, 2015

When protests erupted across the United States late last year, after grand juries failed to indict the police officers who killed Michael Brown and Eric Garner, a friend who works for a prominent media outlet wrote to me wondering “if it’s all just the internet organizing itself.” The nationwide marches and freeway blockades seemed spontaneous, after all, with the Twitter hashtag #BlackLivesMatter being widely used to publicize gathering spots and share images of the demonstrations.

THE ATTACK ON HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDERS IN HAITI

January 27, 2015

An Interview with Jackson Doliscar, Part II

By Beverly Bell

Jackson Doliscar organizing earthquake-displaced people to claim their right to housing. His work almost cost him his life. Photo: Ed Kashi, American Jewish World Service

Community organizer and rights defender Jackson Doliscar speaks to efforts of the Haitian government to silence advocates of human rights and land and housing rights, (See part I of Doliscar’s interview.) The attacks are part of the government’s strategy to leave opposition movements defenseless.

The cases that Doliscar discusses here are only a few of the many instances of violence and illegal imprisonment that the government of Michel Martelly has perpetrated since taking power in a fraudulent election three years ago. Other cases even include the public assassination of the coordinator of the Coalition of Haitian Human Rights Organizations (POHDH by its Creole acronym), Daniel Dorsainvil, and his wife, Girldy Larêche, on February 8, 2014.

The Martelly Administration is becoming increasingly autocratic, including disregarding elections and instead ruling by decree. Nevertheless, the US government continues to provide political and financial support, even including assistance to the lawless police.

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