Other Worlds

Honduras: Indigenous Communities Resist Dams in the Face of Threats and Violence

March 19, 2015

By Brigitte Gynther

Reposted from http://upsidedownworld.org/main/honduras-archives-46/5233-honduras-indigenous-communities-resist-dams-in-the-face-of-threats-and-violence on March 19, 2015

On the evening Jan. 27, a bus of Indigenous Lenca community leaders returning from Rio Blanco, Honduras, the site of an almost two-year Lenca blockade and struggle against the construction of the Agua Zarca dam, was waived to a stop by the police.

Women Up in Arms: Zapatistas and Rojava Kurds embrace a new gender politics.

March 17, 2015

by Charlotte Maria Sáenz

"Office of Women for Dignity" at the Zapatista Autonomous Municipality "Caracol de Oventic," Chiapas, Mexico.

Resistance and strength manifest like weeds through cracks in Chiapas, Mexico and transnational Kurdistan where the respective Zapatista and Kurdish resistance movements are creating new gender relations as a primary part of their struggle and process for building a better world. In both places, women’s participation in the armed forces has been an entry-point for a new social construction of gender relations based on equity.

Here's What Actual Farmers Have To Say About The 'Iowa Agriculture Summit'

March 17, 2015

By Kira Lerner

Reposted from http://thinkprogress.org/election/2015/03/07/3631076/farmers-protest-ag-summit/ on March 31, 2015

Barb Kalbach stands near a hog confinement facility, near Orient, Iowa. Kalbach has fought for more than a decade against the construction of huge hog operations, and has joined Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, a nonprofit that’s against such enterprises because members believe they are ruining Iowa’s waterways.

DES MOINES, IOWA — “I understand the Ag barons have called a party, and you’re crashing it,” Bill Stowe, the CEO of Des Moines Water Works, told a group of farmers, activists and environmentalists gathered on Friday, the night before Republican politicians will ascend on Des Moines for the Iowa Agriculture Summit.


Labour, civil society march against Lagos Govt's plan to privatize water

March 17, 2015

By Ben Ezeamalu

Reposted from http://www.premiumtimesng.com/regional/ssouth-west/178269-labour-civil-society-march-against-lagos-govts-plan-to-privatize-water.html on March 17, 2015

Labour, civil societies march against Lagos Govt's plan to privatize state-owned water supply

Dozens of Labour and Civil Society groups marched in Lagos, Tuesday, to protest the state government’s decision to go ahead with its water privatization plans.



March 12, 2015

Fellsmere and Florida City, Florida

Reposted from http://floridafarmworkers.org/ on March 13, 2015

We are 55 people from 19 organizations from 4 countries - the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, and Brazil, and we are of the following origins: Mexican, Mexican-American, Guatemalan, Salvadoran, Chilean, African American, Native American, Puerto Rican, Brazilian, Canadian, and North America.  We are farmer workers, family farmers and peasants, and technicians from member organizations of Via Campesina, as well as allies from other farmers' organizations, NGOs, students and academics, interpreters and other supporters.


March 12, 2015

By Beverly Bell

Popular radio advocate Sony Estéus in his make-shift radio studio just after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Photo Credit: Roberto (Bear) Guerra 

On the last day of his life, popular radio advocate Sony Estéus was to attend the opening of Voice of Ile-à-Vâche Community Radio (Radio VKI by its Creole acronym), the newest in an expanding network of grassroots stations throughout Haiti. Sony had worked with farmers and fishermen on the island of Ile-à-Vâche for seven years to establish the station.

On March 1, 2015, instead, the 50-year-old Sony died from as-yet-unknown causes.

Gender Equality & Earth's Future

March 10, 2015

By Mary Robinson, Christiana Figueres, & Amina J. Mohammed

Reposted from http://www.wunrn.com/news/2015/03_15/03_09/030915_gender.htm on March 10, 2015

Twenty years ago, the adoption by 189 governments of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action marked a turning point in the history of women's rights. This progressive blueprint remains a powerful source of inspiration in the effort to realize equal opportunities for women and girls. But while much progress has been made in the intervening decades, much more remains to be done to ensure that women and children are guaranteed healthy lives, education, and full social inclusion. In just 42 countries do women hold more than 30% of seats in the national legislature, and girls still do not have the same educational opportunities as boys in Sub-Saharan Africa, Oceania, and western Asia.

International Forum for Agroecology, Nyéléni 2015

March 9, 2015

Declaration of the International Forum for Agroecology

Cross-posted from Food Sovereignty

Originally released on February 27, 2015



We are delegates representing diverse organizations and international movements of small-scale food producers and consumers, including peasants, indigenous peoples and communities (together with hunter and gatherers), family farmers, rural workers, herders and pastoralists, fisherfolk and urban people. Together, the diverse constituencies our organizations represent produce some 70% of the food consumed by humanity. They are the primary global investors in agriculture, as well as the primary providers of jobs and livelihoods in the world.

India's Barefoot College lights up the world

March 6, 2015

College helps to bring electricity to villages around the globe by training poor women to be solar engineers.

By: Shweta Desai

Cross-posted from: Al Jazeera

Originally released on January 15, 2014

Women solar engineers in each of 43 Least Developed Countries will receive training at the college by 2015 [Shweta Desai]



Living in a palm-lined thatched roof house surrounded by dense jungles and rows of corn and cassava in the Santa Teresa village, 42-year-old Florentine until now has spent all her evenings in the dark, literally.

But today, sitting in the dusty village of Tilonia in Rajasthan India, the Mayan woman is lighting the first sparks, which three months from now will bring electricity for the first time in her hometown in Toldeo in Latin America’s Belize.


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