Throughout the world, solutions to some of the greatest challenges of the day are either nascent or fully thriving. Organized people's movements - sometimes with help from supportive government - are changing the structures which cause violence, poverty, inequality, and environmental destruction. At the same time, they are creating better quality of life in their communities.  In other instances, people are preserving ancient cultures where individuals live in relative equity and harmony with other life and their communities, and without expectation of profit. 

Join us to learn more and become a part of this inspiring movement:
  • We are thrilled to announce our latest book, Fault Lines: Views Across Haiti's Divide by Beverly Bell, published by Cornell University Press. You can find out more about the book, read an excerpt, and order it online by visiting the book's website.

  • We continue to support indigenous peoples in Honduras who are defending their lands and rivers, and to challenge US-supported attacks on them by the Honduran government. Honduran movement leaders from the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) have been specifically targeted by the government and international dam companies. Sign the petition supporting them here, call or email the Honduran authorities (demands and suggested talking points can be found in the links), and get updates about the situation via our "Justice in Honduras" section on the left. You can also contribute to Honduras Solidarity Network's Legal Defense Fund.

  • Check out Other Worlds' book & educational tool, Harvesting Justice: Transforming Food, Land, and Agriculture in the Americas, which explores the growing movement to reclaim the food system from multinational agribusiness and put it back into the hands of people. Accompanying the book is a popular education curriculum called Sowing Seeds, and a weekly blog series! And, find more resources and action steps on the Harvesting Justice website.

  • More than four years after the devastating 2010 earthquake, read about how Haitian grassroots movements are continuing the struggle for a just reconstruction on our Another Haiti is Possible blog.
     
  • Visit our blog, below, of articles by and about our allies building grassroots alternatives around the world (click here for full blog history).

Alternatives Blog

GENDER EQUITY FOR RURAL HAITIAN WOMEN: AN INTERVIEW WITH KETTLY ALEXANDRE OF THE PEASANT MOVEMENT OF PAPAY

April 22, 2014

 

Interviewed by Beverly Bell, Edited by Jessica Hsu

April 22, 2014


Kettly Alexandre of the Peasant Movement of Papay Women's Committee. Photo: Beverly Bell

The Peasant Movement of Papay (MPP) is one of the largest small-farmer associations in Haiti with 70,000 members, of whom close to half are women. MPP was founded in 1973 to improve the living conditions of small farmers while working for social and economic justice. Here, Kettly Alexandre of the MPP Women’s Committee speaks to advances made over 40 years for women’s rights, equity, and an end to violence.

El 27 marzo celebraremos nuestro 21° aniversario!

March 26, 2014

Cross-posted from COPINH

Otra cuña para nuestro 21° aniversario. Celebraremos con ceremonias, haciendo memoria histórica, con programas especiales en las radios Lencas del COPINH, reflexión y análisis. http://giss.tv:8000/guarajambala.mp3.m3u
Desde tempranito una compostura a la tierra en UTOPIA. Habrá alborada.

Horizon "Organic" Factory Farm Accused of Improprieties, Again

February 18, 2014

Cross-posted The Cornucopia Institute

Selective Enforcement by USDA Alleged — Kid Glove Treatment for Dean Foods/WhiteWave

In an open letter published today and addressed to USDA National Organic Program chief Miles McEvoy, The Cornucopia Institute accused the regulatory agency of abdicating its enforcement responsibilities.   Cornucopia, an organic industry watchdog, charged that the USDA had allowed Dean Foods and its WhiteWave subsidiary to, allegedly, operate a giant factory farm dairy that has been illegally disadvantaging the nation’s family-scale dairy producers.

 

7000 NO teachers, laid off after Katrina, win court ruling

February 17, 2014

cross-posted from nola.com by Danielle Dreilinger

In a lawsuit that some say could bankrupt the Orleans Parish public school system, an appeals court has decided that the School Board wrongly terminated more than 7,000 teachers after Hurricane Katrina. Those teachers were not given due process, and many teachers had the right to be rehired as jobs opened up in the first years after the storm, the court said. The decision was unanimous.

The Resistance CONTINUES and the Indigenous Mandate in San Francisco de Opalaca

February 10, 2014

Cross-posted from COPINH

COPINH hereby communicates to the world that today, Sunday January 26, 2014, the mandated sovereignty indigenous action continues, in defense of the collective rights to autonomy and respect, for the establishment of the Legitimate Municipal Indigenous Council, to fulfill indigenous governmental functions.  This historic action took place yesterday, in the presence of some 800 Lenca indigenous people of Opalaca, of COPINH and ADRO. 

Versión en español abajo.

IN AMERICA YOU CAN PAY SOMEONE A WAGE OF $2.13 AN HOUR And get away with it

February 10, 2014

Cross-posted from Sky Valley Chronicle

By Marjorie Elizabeth Wood 

At a pancake house in Houston, Claudia spent two hours rolling silverware into napkins on a slow weekend night. Without any tables to serve, she wasn’t tipped to supplement her $2.13 hourly wage. Like many other restaurant employers, Claudia’s boss did not make up for her shortfall in tips despite the legal obligation to do so.

Claudia’s story, reported in the book Behind the Kitchen Door by Saru Jayaraman, speaks for millions who struggle to make ends meet on a tipped minimum wage of $2.13.

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